Valandre Blog

3rd Report – the International K2 Expedition to the North Pillar of K2

Already one week has gone by since our last newsletter and there have been days of great teamwork and a lot of progress on the mountain.

After 3 days of rest and bad weather, we went back up to Camp I on 12 July. At our deposit camp, we packed our backpacks again with some fixing gear, like clamps, ice screws, snow flukes and fixing ropes. We were going to fix one of the steeper parts of the north pillar route. Already at Camp I we were knee-deep in snow, but due to the intensity of the sun during the day, the snow had settled  somewhat. As soon as we had freed our tents from the snow, we had a fortifying meal of garlic fried potatoes that our cook Abdul had prepared for us. We discussed the tactics for the following day, which, however, would not go according to plan.

Continue reading “3rd Report – the International K2 Expedition to the North Pillar of K2” »

Bookmark and Share

2nd Report – Int. K2 expedition to the North Pillar of K2 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits

 

The red dots show our route and what we are up to 7 July cameBild 21 von 21

The red dots show our route and what we are up to 7 July cameBild 21 von 21

2nd Newsletter of the International K2 Expedition to the North Pillar of K2

Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits

On Friday afternoon, 08th July, After four exciting, beautiful but also exhausting days, we returned to our advanced base camp (ABC) at the lower part of the K2 north pillar on Friday afternoon (8th July). We are now planning to rest at this camp, which is also called ‘Italy Base Camp’ (4,650m), for a few days and are hoping to get a break in this extremely changeable weather here. Since we arrived at the Chinese Base Camp (3,900m), a lot has happened.

Continue reading “2nd Report – Int. K2 expedition to the North Pillar of K2 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits” »

Bookmark and Share

1st Report – Int. K2 North Pillar Expedition 2011 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits

1st Report – Int. K2 North Pillar Expedition 2011

Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits

Dear Friends,

Today we’ll get from our base camp, located at 3900 meters.

Since we landed in Bishkek, a lot has happened.
Darek we already met at our stopover in Moscow, Maxut and Vassiliy then in Bishkek at breakfast in the hotel, where we could make a little fresh. After the two had her Chinese visa, we were able to drive off towards the Chinese border, first to Tash Rabat. A few lonely yurt were located at about 3000 meters our sleeping quarters. Yuri and his wife are the summer up there to entertain people passing by. A very nice couple Kyrgyz. The next morning we tried yet fermented mare’s milk from the neighboring small horse farm. A bit strange sbedürftiger taste, but should be said to be very healthy!
Continue reading “1st Report – Int. K2 North Pillar Expedition 2011 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits” »

Bookmark and Share

The 14 peaks over 8000 meters

Only 14 peaks in the world raise up over 8000m into what today is known as “the dead zone”. All are situated in the Himalaya range spread over countries like: Nepal, India, Pakistan and Tibet.

THE WORLD'S HIGHEST PEAKS

The beginning

The first expedition to set foot on a 8000m peak was achieved by a French expedition in June 3th 1950, when the guide Louis Lachenal from Annecy together with Maurice Herzog from Lyon, set foot on the summit of Annapurna. As a first time ever achievement, Lachenal and Herzog climbed the dangerous peak of 8091m without the use of supplemental oxygen. A big French success, as just the logistic problems transporting the gear and equipment from France to Nepal in 1950, was a major and expensive obstacle, to what you can add climbing up into unknown conditions. Maurice Herzog was the first to reach the summit, followed closely by Louis Lachenal, though reaching the summit, and especially without the use of supplemental oxygen, they were forced to pay the price:  Herzog’s decision to opt for lighter boots, and the loss of his gloves near the summit allowed frostbite to set in quickly, resulting in extensive amputations on both hands and both feet.

Maurice Herzog Annapurna Maurice Herzog

What makes the French expedition to Annapurna special is not only the fact that it was the first 8000+ meter peak climbed, it was also the first that was scouted and climbed entirely in one climbing season, a feat not easily repeated, especially in the golden era of mountaineering.

Since Annapurna in 1950, Climbers have learned from the experiences made, and what was in the beginning heavy National expeditions, are now light international “low budget” expeditions. At the end of 2011, only 24 people have climbed all 14 8000, and the latest to join “the club” is Japanese climber Hirotaka Takeushi, who summited his last 8000m peak: Dhaulagiri May 26th at 05:30PM local time.

Alpinism is often infused with the fundamental question of puritanism. In this spirit, climbs being made without the use of supplemental oxygen, nor porters and hence in alpine style, are regarded as the ultimate human engagement confronted with a 8000. And in this game, there are only a small club left of 13 climbers in the world, having completed this achievement.

 

Continue reading “The 14 peaks over 8000 meters” »

Bookmark and Share

Before we depart for our expedition to K2 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits

 

Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner, Ralf Dujmovits

Dear Friends

I would like to give you a brief update before we depart for our expedition to K2. On Monday, we were finally able to send our cargo, which was a lot more than usual, as we do not have any stored gear in China.

When I wrote my last newsletter, it was not certain whether our friends from Kazakhstan would join us, so I am now even more than happy to tell you that they will be part of our expedition. Our team is now complete.

 

Continue reading “Before we depart for our expedition to K2 | Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits” »

Bookmark and Share