Valandre Blog

Billi Bierling at the Friedrichshafen Outdoor show

Billi Bierling interviews Hirotaka Takeushi (June 5th 12) in Kathmandu after his last 14 8000: Dhaulagiri.

Billi Bierling interviews Hirotaka Takeushi (June 5th 12) in Kathmandu after his last 14 8000: Dhaulagiri.

Barbara Bierling from Garmisch, will join Valandre at our “come back show” at the European Outdoor show in Friedrichshafen Germany July 12 – 15 in Hall 7 stand 307.

Barbara, better known in the community, as Billi, has scaled 3 8000: Everest 21.05.2009, Manaslu 01.10.2010, Lhotse 24.05.2011. In 2011 Billi tested her skills again, climbing Manaslu a second time without the use of supplemental oxygen. In lower speed, Billi reached the summit, and returned safely.

Billi is a late converted into sports. Born in Garmisch, Billi has a natural attachment to Alpinism and Mountaineering, and starts her day with a 45min spin around the block, cold shower and a Yogurt without sugar. What more do you need in life?

Billi....On Lhotse...26.05.11.."in extase"

Billi….On Lhotse…26.05.11..”in extase”

Billi is today totally dedicated to Himalayan climbing, besides being active on the peaks. Thanks to her formation as Journalist in England, Billi is an active writer. As an English speaking journalist, Billi has assisted MISS Elizabeth Hawley in Kathmandu for more than 7 years and interviewed the returning expedition, keeping the records up to date.

Billi on Manaslu 01.10.2010....using supplemental Margaritas

Billi on Manaslu 01.10.2010….using supplemental “Margaritas”.

Assistant to the AKASHA CHRONICLE of MISS Elizabeth Hawley, Billi holds an extremely interesting conversation, and it is always a pleasure, to have her around. Being a friend of Valandre, Billi accepted to join us at the Friedrichshafen show in Hall 7 booth 307.

So, swing by if you have a second.

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Hirotaka Takeushi becomes the first Japanese on the 14 8000

Hirotaka Takeushi first Japanese on the 14 8000Hirotaka Takeushi first Japanese on the 14 8000

Saturday 26th at 05:30pm (17:30) Hirotaka Takeushi (竹内洋岳) summited his final 14 8000 Dhaulagiri (8167m/26.795ft). Kenro Nakajima (Climber and cameraman) was due to take part in the summit push, but apparently he turned around between CII (6600m) and CIII at 7400m.

Hirotaka collected all the necessary gear, and carried on alone. An interesting fact, as Hirotaka is nick named “Solitary man” in Japan.

We are now waiting for his summit images, and eventually summit videos. According to information’s, Hiro should air in the “NEWS ZERO” on NTV today at 22:54h (Japan time)

A BIG congratulations to MISTER Hirotaka Takeushi for his final 14 8000, and the fact that the question who would become the first Japanese to complete this task, has now found the final answer.

Listen to Hirotaka Takeushi on radio from Dhaulagiri BC:




Blog:竹内洋岳 – Hirotaka Takeuchi

 

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Summit push…

Hirotaka takeuchi and Kenro Nakasima

Hirotaka Takeushi is now pushing for the Dhaulagiri summit. Accompanied by Kenro Nakasima, who is both climbing partner as well as cameraman, Kenro will hopefully send us the expected photos and evt video, once Hiro sets foot on his last 8000m peak.
According to Takeushi, the summit window is open May 26th.

We at Valandre wish both of you, good luck!

Go now Hiro

Blog: Hirotaka Takeushi

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Hirotaka Takeuchi – Dhaulagiri 2012

Hiro… “Flat out”

May 15th: In the community, Japanese climbers have always been known and are highly respected, for the routes they managed to open. Pushing the limits into unimaginable dimensions. Take and his Japanese team, have now entered a new ground breaking dimension at the Dhaulagiri BC, by test flying a counter rotated electrical helicopter at 4600m altitude.

 

 

A remarkable performance getting it airborne in this thin air, that even the NHK film crew had to get the event on video! At this point it seems evident, that Hirotaka Takeushi will tempt a first time ever: To become the first Japanese having completed the 14 8000, and to air lift a counter rotated electrical helicopter from the summit of his final 14 8000.

 

 

We at Valandre hope to become witness to such an event in a summit video: Mr Hirotaka Takeuchi launches a counter rotated electrical helicopter from the summit of his final 14 8000 from 8167m/26.795ft.

PLEASE – PLEASE HIRO…….do it!

 

Japanese “Pas de deux”…

May 11th: Take and Kenro, has set up their C2 camp at 6600m. Weather conditions are un-usably “hot”, so the long climb from C1 to C2 was very tiring for both. According to their report, the camp was set up in a record time of 30min, but as everybody knows, Japanese climbers select good and reliant equipment…

 

Ventilator ON……….

May 4th: Ok… Take’s moving in to get it over, and become the first Japanese on the 14 8000.

 

Wonderfull Kathmandou

May 2th: Hirotaka sends us a Japanese post card from Kathmandu! But – You are a Pro Hiro….time to go to work dude!

 

A day at the “Hard Rock Caffe”……….

April 28th: Once having summited ImjaTse peak, Hiro and Kenro went back into the valley. Obviously they are having fun together, so they mixed up a new video of their climb, adding rhythm and music…….. After posting it, they went into town and “Disco danced” all night!

 

Prime rehearsal before Dhaulagiri

April 24th: Hirotaka is currently training on ImjaTse in the Himalayas, better known as Island Peak (6,189 m (20,305 ft)), as part of the acclimatization process before attacking his last 8000m peak: Dhaulagiri (8167m). Hiro had a tuff way to the 14 8000, with some serious situations. On Everest 2005, Hiro had a cerebral edema, but Ralf and Gerlinde got him down alive. And on Gasherbrum in 2007, Hiro was hit by an avalanche with broken backbone and was rescued by helicopter. We are now many in the world, who are waiting for Hiro to complete his 14 8000 this spring.

 

Where to go training on a sunny day?: Just shoot straight
up the Imja Tse (6,189 m (20,305 ft)).

Hirotaka Takeuchi is an experienced Japanese high altitude climber, with currently 13 8000 peaks successfully behind him. Now facing this ultimate challenge, Hiro has joined with Kenro Nakasima (Climber + cameraman), both are attacking Dhaulagiri, in alpine style without supplemental oxygen.

Shortly, Hiro will summit his last 8000 and will become the first Japanese having accomplished this. We wish you good luck Hiro… time to step into the crampons… and GO!


Takeuchi’s “listing”:

1 ) 22.05.1995 Makalu 8485m (Oxygen)

2 ) 17.05.1996 Everest 8848m (Oxygen)

3 ) 14.08.1996 K2 8611m 8611m (Oxygen)

4 ) 30.06.2001 Nanga Parbat 8125m (with Ralf Dujmovits)

5 ) 28.05.2004 Annapurna 8091m (with Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & RalfDujmovits)

6 ) 25.07.2004 Gasherbrum I 8080m (with Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits)

7 ) 07.05.2005 Shisha Pangma 8027m (with Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits)

8 ) 14.05.2006 Kanchenjunga 8586m (with Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits)

9) 19.05.2007 Manaslu 8163m (with Ralf Dujomovits)

10 ) 08.07.2008 Gasherbrum II 8034m

11 ) 31.07.2008 Broad Peak 8051m

12 ) 20.05.2009 Lhotse 8516m (with Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner & Ralf Dujmovits)

13 ) 30.09.2011 Cho Oyu 8188m

 


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The 14 peaks over 8000 meters

Only 14 peaks in the world raise up over 8000m into what today is known as “the dead zone”. All are situated in the Himalaya range spread over countries like: Nepal, India, Pakistan and Tibet.

THE WORLD'S HIGHEST PEAKS

The beginning

The first expedition to set foot on a 8000m peak was achieved by a French expedition in June 3th 1950, when the guide Louis Lachenal from Annecy together with Maurice Herzog from Lyon, set foot on the summit of Annapurna. As a first time ever achievement, Lachenal and Herzog climbed the dangerous peak of 8091m without the use of supplemental oxygen. A big French success, as just the logistic problems transporting the gear and equipment from France to Nepal in 1950, was a major and expensive obstacle, to what you can add climbing up into unknown conditions. Maurice Herzog was the first to reach the summit, followed closely by Louis Lachenal, though reaching the summit, and especially without the use of supplemental oxygen, they were forced to pay the price:  Herzog’s decision to opt for lighter boots, and the loss of his gloves near the summit allowed frostbite to set in quickly, resulting in extensive amputations on both hands and both feet.

Maurice Herzog Annapurna Maurice Herzog

What makes the French expedition to Annapurna special is not only the fact that it was the first 8000+ meter peak climbed, it was also the first that was scouted and climbed entirely in one climbing season, a feat not easily repeated, especially in the golden era of mountaineering.

Since Annapurna in 1950, Climbers have learned from the experiences made, and what was in the beginning heavy National expeditions, are now light international “low budget” expeditions. At the end of 2011, only 24 people have climbed all 14 8000, and the latest to join “the club” is Japanese climber Hirotaka Takeushi, who summited his last 8000m peak: Dhaulagiri May 26th at 05:30PM local time.

Alpinism is often infused with the fundamental question of puritanism. In this spirit, climbs being made without the use of supplemental oxygen, nor porters and hence in alpine style, are regarded as the ultimate human engagement confronted with a 8000. And in this game, there are only a small club left of 13 climbers in the world, having completed this achievement.

 

Continue reading “The 14 peaks over 8000 meters” »

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